Product Psychology Explains How To Get Users Hooked On Products Designed Around Habit And Context

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

product psychology

Last year, tens of thousands of hackers signed up to receive Hack Design, a newsletter teaching the principles of design so that those used to focusing on how things work behind the scenes could start at a point that also considers aesthetics and user-friendliness.

Today, a group of product-focused creators — “Hooked” author Nir Eyal, Product Hunt‘s Ryan Hoover, and Greylock Partners‘s Josh Elman, among others — are hoping to follow up on that newsletter’s success with the launch of Product Psychology, a weekly course on the psychology of user behavior.

Courses will arrive in the form of link-blog like posts delivered to your email inbox. Each week, one curator from the 17 psychologists, entrepreneurs, and designers involved in the project focuses on a single topic they’re especially versed in, with posts ranging from “How Scarcity & Impatience Drive User Behavior” to “Does Your…

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Thomas Piketty’s “Capital in the Twenty-first Century” explained

Originally posted on ideas.ted.com:

A Piketty guide for lifelong learners.

When Thomas Piketty’s “Capital in the Twenty-first Century” was published earlier this year, it was something of a sensation. That’s no small feat for a chart-heavy doorstop on “the dismal science” of economics.

A fair portion of the book’s notoriety was due to its subject matter: wealth distribution, an intensely political topic if ever there was one. (Watch Piketty’s TED Talk: New thoughts on capital in the twenty-first century.)

What makes this French economist’s conclusions worth global notice? The short answer is that Piketty and his research team amassed a mountain of data, much of it going back centuries, suggesting that the concentration of wealth in ever-fewer hands is not an anomaly or a recent development. Check out the infographic below for a longer explanation:

piketty-infographic-compressed

As the data visualization above suggests, this is simply how capitalism works. Without a significant force to counterbalance rising…

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Politique: Comment Rediger Un Communiquer de Presse Au Front National

Voir toute la sequence de ce reportage de France3.

How millennials spend

Originally posted on Quartz:

Just how different are millennials?

So far, quite. They are spending money differently than previous generations, preferring to throw cash at new experiences and adventures and to reward socially responsible companies that they can connect with and that they deem authentic. It’s easiest to see this change in the food industry, where millennials are helping to disrupt the landscape of casual restaurants and boosting the earnings of chains such as Chipotle or Panera.

As 2013 research from the Boston Consulting Group found, millennials anticipated spending the greatest amount of money in the coming year on fresh fruits, organic food, and natural products. Less favorable, in their minds, was the idea of spending on luxury goods, soda, applications, and handbags.

Reported taste in spending

If there is one industry that millennials particularly dislike, it’s big banks. A three-year research study of more than 10,000 millennials found that a good handful of the least-liked brands were big financial…

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Trieste Independence Demonstration

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Photos: Richmond Upon Thames

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